Little Sparkles
Little Sparkles
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framenoir:

Are we ready Paris?
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fishstickmonkey:

Portland, Dorset, England, 2011.  from The Last Stand - Marc Wilson  (via The Last Stand: Photographs by Marc Wilson: Places: Design Observer)
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googlepoet:

www.googlepoetics.com
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darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
darwinmagazine:

The Desolation of the Romanian landscape.
 
Editors Pick
 
Tamas Dezso - Notes for an Epilogue 
 
Crumbling buildings desolated and abandoned places, which in photography terms all lead to the generic overtones of another project trying to represent social problems within working communities. It has always been a troubling cliché within photography, a photographer travelling to somewhere lesser off than what the intended audience is used to, and showing them a face of poverty. Whilst acting as a tool for documenting events and current climates, it is a very questionable as to wether it is fully needed within our current culture of looking.
 
 Yet the odors of repetition are voided whilst looking at the staggeringly beautiful and engaging images of Tamas Dezso. The work focuses itself within a particular setting, Romania and what has been left behind, and who is left there co existing with the left over matter. We are introduced to window smashed buildings, birds soaring over a rubbish wasteland, in search of food in the cold Romanian winter. Life is evidently tough here; it’s a fact, which is difficult to escape from, yet through the strong compositions and scenic beauty on hand, a balancing act is being performed within this body of work. We are introduced to stone faces carved into the side of a cliff side, whilst more stone faces of the subjects themselves weave their way in and out of this project, the faces are tough, hard baring, deadpan and vacant. 
 
One photograph in particular stands out from the rest, a boy within a bearskin. The connotations within this photograph are almost perfect, as if everything, which is said within this project, has manifested itself into one unique photograph. The boy is small; he looks directly as us, a level of innocence within a powerful and dangerous animal. The boy has become part of the landscape when he wears this guise, there is a timeless element to this photograph, the feeling that this photograph is reverting back to older times, more in touch times in relation to land and man, as if within ruin, the local communities have had to go back into the landscape and be part of the land, as a result to the end of communism in 1989. This of level of working with the land crosses over to working with what is left over, the scraps of metal from factories to provide as some form of income and a way to survive. 
 
With this need to survive and get by, the worn faces of the occupants are ever more focused in on. One photograph which echo’s that of classic portrait painting, a woman standing and looking into the mirror, holding her face, its would be difficult to comprehend the type of worries and woes going on within her head, yet the reflection is what grabs you. It feels as if it’s a painting not a photograph, an aged one at that. In a way, it could be suggested that she is looking into the past of a long history of the same circumstances she finds herself in..
 
Overall this body of work, as far as contemporary documentary work goes holds plenty to enjoy on a pure aesthetic level, yet if you wish to look deeper, is riddled with ideas and problems these subjects face in day to day life.
 Words by Harry Rose
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googlepoet:

www.googlepoetics.com
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rosswolfe:

gothic tankkris kuksi, esculturas goticas
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wgsn:

Mirrored conceptual surfaces for #AW14 from Gareth Pugh #PFW
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curatingwomen:

WOW 2014 AT SOUTHBANK CENTRE 5 - 9 March
It’s time for Women Of the World festival again at the Southbank Centre. Focusing on what it is to be a woman in this day and age, talks and workshops cover a range of politics, art, science, activism, sex and fashion. Now a few years old, the festival is open in it’s approach, and is encouragingly not dubbed an all-female affair. In fact, this year representatives from the inaugural BAM (Being A Man) festival will talk about their experiences in relation to WOW.
One of the greatest things about WOW is the range of topics discussed, and the variety of ways issues are brought to the fore. This year sees a talk by the inspirational Malala Yousafzai (though due to demand you have to pay for a separate ticket) as well as the ‘Under-10 feminists corner’; ‘Art Will Change the World’; talks on FGM and even ‘Beyonce and Me’ which debates the inner conflict of being a Beyonce-loving feminist before teaching the steps to ‘Who Runs The World’.
In other words, this is not a dry symposium of academic feminism or gender theory, but rather an inclusive festival encouraging wide, varied and practical views on ‘what it is to be a woman’. Some of the events might not be right up your street - there are some that could be deemed as more surface or privileged in comparison to the hard hitting subjects of rape and violence against women - but there really is something for everyone, which I believe can only be a positive thing. What is more, now the festival runs from Weds-Sunday, there’s plenty of time to work out what you would really like to go and see and head on down.
Find out more at http://wow.southbankcentre.co.uk